Recipes

Greek Quiche
Since one of the Greek Sisters (Joanna) is a vegetarian, she’s always coming up with ways to make Greek dishes without meat. This recipe takes a couple of components from Greek favorites but is prepared like a quiche, which makes it easy to omit meat and easy to make. So we have potatoes from moussaka, spinach and feta from spanakopita, and eggs to hold it together like a quiche. Interesting… and delicious!

Since one of the Greek Sisters (Joanna) is a vegetarian, she’s always coming up with ways to make Greek dishes without meat. This recipe takes a couple of components from Greek favorites but is prepared like a quiche, which makes it easy to omit meat and easy to make. So we have potatoes from moussaka, spinach and feta from spanakopita, and eggs to hold it together like a quiche. Interesting… and delicious!

Greek Yogurt Lemon Cake
Joanna was looking at recipes for a Lemon cake. She loves Lemon cake (Lemon Loaf, Lemon Poppy muffins…you get the picture, she’s a lemon fan). She came across a few that she liked. Most had buttermilk or milk in the recipe so she thought why not replace it with Greek yogurt! Well the results were fantastic!

Joanna was looking at recipes for a Lemon cake. She loves Lemon cake (Lemon Loaf, Lemon Poppy muffins…you get the picture, she’s a lemon fan). She came across a few that she liked. Most had buttermilk or milk in the recipe so she thought why not replace it with Greek yogurt! Well the results were fantastic!

Melitzanosalata
The translation of melitzanosalata literally means “eggplant salad” but this dish is more of a dip or spread than it is a salad. There are two variations of this delicious “salad”. There is “country style” and there is “city style”. The one we made here is a little bit of both. With “country style”, you generally add chopped tomatoes, but my sister Joanna doesn’t like it with tomatoes. She thinks of it as a filler and when it comes to this dip, she’s a purist. And I agree.

The translation of melitzanosalata literally means “eggplant salad” but this dish is more of a dip or spread than it is a salad. There are two variations of this delicious “salad”. There is “country style” and there is “city style”. The one we made here is a little bit of both. With “country style”, you generally add chopped tomatoes, but my sister Joanna doesn’t like it with tomatoes. She thinks of it as a filler and when it comes to this dip, she’s a purist. And I agree.

Greek Easter Tsoureki
We played around a lot over the years with tsoureki recipes. There are different variations depending on what part of Greece the recipe hails from. I think we found our favorite! Not only is it delicious but it will make the house smell amazing! Here we left out the traditional red dyed Easter egg in the center because we never eat it but feel free to add it). The recipe will make 7 6-inch braids or 3-4 large braids. You can also use leftover tsoureki (if you have any!) as your bread for french toast or a croque monsieur sandwich. Sooo good!

We played around a lot over the years with tsoureki recipes. There are different variations depending on what part of Greece the recipe hails from. I think we found our favorite! Not only is it delicious but it will make the house smell amazing! Here we left out the traditional red dyed Easter egg in the center because we never eat it but feel free to add it). The recipe will make 7 6-inch braids or 3-4 large braids. You can also use leftover tsoureki (if you have any!) as your bread for french toast or a croque monsieur sandwich. Sooo good!

Halva
Halva is a popular dessert in Greece that is traditionally made with semolina. There are a few variations depending on what part of Greece you’re from. Our mother used to make it with olive oil and farina, as semolina was not as easy to find here in the States. There are oven and stove top versions. We did a stove top version here, using butter, farina and a cake mold. You can easily replace the butter with olive or canola oil, or use half and half, and replace the farina with semolina. It’s a quick and easy dessert. Oh… and it’s delicious!

Halva is a popular dessert in Greece that is traditionally made with semolina. There are a few variations depending on what part of Greece you’re from. Our mother used to make it with olive oil and farina, as semolina was not as easy to find here in the States. There are oven and stove top versions. We did a stove top version here, using butter, farina and a cake mold. You can easily replace the butter with olive or canola oil, or use half and half, and replace the farina with semolina. It’s a quick and easy dessert. Oh… and it’s delicious!

Gallery

Newsletter